Posts Tagged ‘waipahu’

Jerome Williams – Spreading Aloha, One Pitch at a Time

January 1, 2014

When you see Major League pitcher Jerome Williams for the first time, you see a big, strong man with hands the size of a grizzly bear. At 6’3″ and 240 lbs, you know for sure that he’s an athlete, and was likely “bred” somewhere in the Midwest.

And then he opens his mouth.

Bruddah’s first words to me were in pidgin. I loved it. And as we got to talking, his humble and down to earth nature made me feel right at home as if we grew up together back in the day. Just choke Aloha. The big grizzly bear had suddenly turned into a soft teddy bear. πŸ˜›

Jerome Williams and author Edward Sugimoto
Jerome Williams and author Edward Sugimoto

Williams was born and raised in Waipahu Hawaii. As a Marauder standout, he was selected, at the tender age of 17, by the San Francisco Giants as the 39th overall pick in the first round of the 1999 Major League Baseball draft. By 21, he made his big league debut – a tough loss against the Philadelphia Phillies – but closed out the year with 88 strikeouts, a 3.30 ERA and winning 7-5 record.

His baseball career has taken him all over the league with stints with the Giants, Chicago Cubs and Washington Nationals, as well as all over the world, playing in leagues as far away as Mexico, Puerto Rico, Venezuela, and Taiwan. His most recent gig with the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim was cut short this past off season when the Angels decided not to tender his contract, which actually now opens the door to sign on as a full time starter (Williams’ preference) for a number of interested teams vying for his attention.

I recently caught up with Williams during his recent trip back home to Hawaii.

 

Jerome Williams Interview

 

[Edward Sugimoto] First of all Happy (32nd) Birthday! (Jerome’s birthday is on 12/4/81)

[Jerome Williams] Thank you man, thank you.

[Edward Sugimoto] Did you do anything fun for your birthday?

[Jerome Williams] Well, not yet…

[Edward Sugimoto] Still early?

[Jerome Williams] Still early in the morning. Actually, I goin go see my mom. My mom stay up in um, down Kaneohe side (Hawaiian Memorial Park Mortuary). I’m gonna see my mom today. I always do that every year on my birthday. Go see my mother.

[Edward Sugimoto] Not many people know this, but you’re part Hawaiian.

[Jerome Williams] Yeah.

[Edward Sugimoto] (What’s) Your favorite Hawaiian word?

[Jerome Williams] Da kine (laughs).

Jerome Williams during our interview (Photo Credit: Arthur Betts IV)
Jerome Williams during our interview (Photo Credit: Arthur Betts IV)

[Edward Sugimoto] (laughs) That’s a good one. And what about your favorite phrase in pidgin?

[Jerome Williams] It’s explicit so I cannot say. Nah, most of my friends we always talk and there’s a lot of explicit stuff in it, but sometimes I get to a point where I use it a lot up in the mainland and guys don’t understand so I try not to say nothing.

[Edward Sugimoto] You can actually use it!

[Jerome Williams] I can’t actually use it at all. But like I said, it’s explicit so I can’t really say on air.

[Edward Sugimoto] No worries, no worries. In some what bittersweet news, the Angels decided not to tender your contract yesterday, making you a free agent. Your agent Larry O’Brien has been quoted though as saying that it could be a blessing in disguise because you could start for a number of other teams. What are your current thoughts on that and have you given any thought to a team you might want to pitch for?

[Jerome Williams] Um, you know, I think it’s a good thing for me. The years I was with the Angels I was a swing man. I was in the bullpen and starting, but you know, I really wanted to stay with the Angels. I just bought a home there. Like how you said, it is bittersweet. I felt like I had a new beginning with them and you know right now it’s just a waiting process. I’m a free agent now. There’s a lot of teams I really want to go to. First of all, I want to stay on the west coast. Closer to home, closer to my family. Also too, I want to be at a place where I can have spring training in Arizona (Cactus League). I really don’t like to go all the way down to Florida (Grapefruit League). It’s a long haul all the way out there and the travel for the games and all that stuff. Your closest trip is two hours. That’s the longest trip in Arizona. I just want to try and be closer to Arizona and closer to home.

[Edward Sugimoto] You’ve had a lot of twists and turns in your baseball career taking you all over the world (including stints in Puerto Rico and Taiwan). At any point, did you ever feel like giving up?

[Jerome Williams] Um, I want to say probably in 2008. 2007 I was with the Nationals and in 2008 I couldn’t find a job. I couldn’t find a job anywhere so I played independent ball. And the year I played independent ball, I thought I wasn’t going to make it back at all. But my wife and kids and my family, they always supported me so that year I got picked up and then I went to Puerto Rico to play winter ball. I got picked up by Oakland and then that next year I went to Taiwan. And then I went up and down playing from like I said Taiwan, Puerto Rico for winter ball, Venezuela for winter ball, Mexico for winter ball, so you know, I’ve been all over the place to try and get back to where I needed to be and fortunately, I got picked up by the Angels when I was in Independent ball in 2011.

[Edward Sugimoto] It was a good thing you didn’t give up because you had somewhat of a renaissance in your career.

[Jerome Williams] Exactly. All that hard work, everything that I’ve been through, it made me stronger.

[Edward Sugimoto] For those who don’t know, you wear a pink glove when you pitch. Can you talk a little bit about what that represents to you?

[Jerome Williams] When I first got drafted, my mom was alive. And then in 2001 my mom passed away from breast cancer so at that time I wanted to honor her and wear a puka shell necklace cause she actually gave it to me. But as the years went on, I got bigger and the necklace got smaller (smiles), so it broke. But in 2010 when I was in Taiwan, I was on a trip up there and I was real flashy with gloves out there. They’re real flashy with it. And the first time I went by a store, I seen a pink glove and I told myself I was going to get one. So that next year, 2011 would’ve been 10 years (since the passing of his mom) so I just wanted to pay tribute to my mom so I wore a pink glove. That’s what the pink glove represents it represents my mother who passed away with breast cancer. I wear it every day on the mound. The first glove I had that I brought to the big leagues, I still have it. I don’t use it anymore because I got another contract with Woodz. They gave me a contract (smiles). I’m the first non-Taiwanese player to (be) sponsor(ed) (wearing) their gloves in the major leagues so I’m pretty thankful for that. Just by using the pink glove it shows awareness of breast cancer. I know some people know that the MLB, they do breast cancer days. Breast Cancer day is every day for me.

[Edward Sugimoto] Do you think you’re going to start a trend with other pitchers?

[Jerome Williams] Well, if that trend starts, I’m the original guy to do it so hopefully I can get recognized for that first, and then people can do it.

[Edward Sugimoto] Your name, your moniker on Twitter and Instagram is @pinkpuka57. You mentioned the glove and the puka shell… Is that kinda where it came from?

[Jerome Williams] That’s how it came about. In the beginning when I first got called up, like I said, I wore the puka shell necklace and a couple of the guys on the team used to call me, that used to be my nickname is “puka” so that’s how they knew me as. And then once I had the pink glove and everything and then my number (57), then I was like you know what, I might as well put all those three together and make it just one.

Jerome Williams during our interview (Photo Credit: Arthur Betts IV)
Jerome Williams during our interview (Photo Credit: Arthur Betts IV)

[Edward Sugimoto] What is your typical day like back here in the islands?

[Jerome Williams] It depends. I know my wife and kids, they’ve been here a lot, so we try and hit up some places to go eat. The stuff that we don’t have up in California. The first day I arrived, I went straight to Jackie’s Diner in Waimalu. And then, last night, I took my wife to Shiro’s (Saimin Haven) in Ewa. The other day I went to Highway Inn. Highway Inn, I used to live right across the street from there. So we just try to hit up the places that we know we can’t get out in California and also too, just try to spend time with family and friends. Usually on the weekends and even during the week, friends, they come to the house, or I actually go to them. They play softball at Waipahu Rec Center or at CORPs. They ask me sometimes if I want to go play with them, and I play with them! I actually try and give back to the guys that actually gave back to me. That’s the true friends that I want to see. That’s the true friends that I want to hang out with. Sometimes I’ll go and see one of my good friends Bubba from Rebel Souljahz. They were born and raised in Waipahu and I remember when they were little kids. I always try and support them. The other night, I went to Republik to support Maoli and Jordan T. So I met those guys too. You know I just want to try and support anybody that’s from Hawaii that’s doing well and also too my family and friends.

[Edward Sugimoto] What are your favorite non baseball related hobbies?

[Jerome Williams] For some odd reason, everybody looks at me and they don’t think electronics, but I’m an electronic freak. Right now, I have all of my kids all on the electronics. My four year old knows how to use an iPad from left to right. And, actually, he knows how to do Minecraft. I don’t even know how to do Minecraft! So I got my kids doing Minecraft, I love computers, I love music. I like anything with any electronical type of things. Sometimes I like to do my car, like speakers, integrate my iPod into it so I’m really big into that. And then also too I like to play basketball but I can’t play basketball because I’m under contract. And my wife is like you don’t need to play basketball right now because you’re a free agent and if you get hurt then, next thing you know, you can’t play. I’m kinda pissed off about that. That’s the type of cardio I like to do, but I know how basketball is here, especially outside, and especially of what I am, people would probably want to try and hurt me.

[Edward Sugimoto] You mentioned your iPod. What’s on your iPod right now… Some of your favorites?

[Jerome Williams] It goes from electronics to dub step to reggae to Hawaiian music, hip hop, r & b, rock, country, I mean everything. I just looked at my computer because I put a 1 terabyte hard drive inside my computer and right now, on my iTunes, I have 316 gigs of music. So it’s equivalent to almost 55,000 songs. I have all that on top my computer and I showed my dad and my dad was like “Why the hell do you need all that music? You don’t even listen to it.” And I was like “No, trust me, I’ll listen to it.” But it’s cool to have those types of music because maybe one day, you want to try and browse through it and you’ll be like “Oh dang I used to listen to that when I was in high school.”

[Edward Sugimoto] Yeah, brings back memories.

[Jerome Williams] Yup.

[Edward Sugimoto] You mentioned Jordan T… Any other favorite Hawaiian bands?

[Jerome Williams] You know Jordan T, Maoli. Who else you got? Iration, of course Rebel (Souljahz). Some of the newer stuff, I really don’t listen to cause we don’t have that access up in the mainland but when I do come down, I always try and help them out, I always try and listen to it. I’m really an old school guy with the Hawaiian music. I can go back to Natty Vibes (Natural Vibrations), go down to Kapena, Hui Ohana. Hui Ohana is one of my favorites because that’s what my mom used to dance to. She used to dance hula and there’s one song I always listen to when I feel down and out. It was a song that my mom used to dance to called Sweet Lei Mokihana. Actually I listened to that song on my first win in the major leagues after I came out of the game because it soothes me and it always reminds me of my mother.

[Edward Sugimoto] You are one of only a handful of Hawaii bred baseball players in the Major Leagues so the fraternity is pretty tight I’m assuming. How often do you get to chat with people like Vic (Shane Victorino), Brandon League, and Kolten Wong, etc.?

[Jerome Williams] It’s kinda hard to talk to Brandon and Kolten because they were in the National League at that time, and I played Vic twice a year, I played him one time in Boston and one time at home in Anaheim, but whenever I get the chance, I always want to try and reach out to them. When Kurt (Suzuki) and Kila (Ka’aihue) was in Oakland, I talked to them almost every time because they’re in the same division. It’s a funny story because every time I talk to them pidgin comes out. So one of the guys on the team, LaTroy Hawkins, actually came up to me and was like “Jerome, are you from Hawaii?” and I’m like “Yes.” and he was like “Well, I want you to talk to Kila and Kurt right now. I want you to talk to them right now just like how you talk back at home.” OK, so we started talking and he kinda actually stopped me. And he was like “Jerome, I don’t understand what you said, but from what you did say, I know you’re from Hawaii.” I’m like, “OK, I told you guys that!” Because everybody thinks you know I’m black, but they don’t believe that I’m from Hawaii. I was born and raised here, born and raised in Waipahu, everybody don’t believe that. But getting back to what you said about all the guys, yeah, it’s a tight fraternity and we always want to try and see each other or try and talk to each other or give each other information. I don’t know if you guys were reading things on Twitter when we had the World Series. You never found that. That’s the first time ever you had two Hawaii guys in the World Series playing against each other. I was pulling for Vic because me and Vic, we got drafted with each other and I knew him for a long time. Kolten…

[Edward Sugimoto] Didn’t play that much anyway…

[Jerome Williams] Well he did play a couple times, a couple times he did good and the one time he did bad, but you know what. At least he had the opportunity to get there. I mean, I never got an opportunity to get there. I’ve been playing for, since I was like what, my first year was in ’03. I’m happy for them getting there and especially for Kolten. He’s gonna have the opportunity to play second (base) now for the Cardinals. Hopefully he can shine and do well too.

[Edward Sugimoto] And finally, do you have a word for your fans out there?

[Jerome Williams] Awww man, fans. Shoot. I know you guys follow me on Twitter and Instagram @pinkpuka57. Thanks for all the support you have done for me. I always try and give back to Hawaii any way I can and this is one of the ways I want to give back, saying thank you to you guys. It’s been a long road for me and I know you guys know my story. Every time I come back I always want to try and do something for Hawaii. This is my way of saying thank you. Thank you to everybody and um, just keep supporting me. Like I said, follow me on Instagram and Twitter @pinkpuka57. Aloha. Thank you.

Jerome Williams and photographer/videographer Arthur Betts IV
Jerome Williams and photographer/videographer Arthur Betts IV

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Where In the Hawaii is Edward Sugimoto? – December 1, 2010

December 1, 2010

Sorry for da lateness! Shmall kine busy! To reward your patience, let’s do some “Lucky you live Hawaii” shots this week. Can you tell where these are???


Photo #1
Where In the Hawaii is Edward Sugimoto? - December 1, 2010
Where In the Hawaii is Edward Sugimoto? – December 1, 2010

Points for Photo #1…
* Location?: 2 points
* General area?: 1 point
* Closest street(s)?: 1 point each
* Why wuz we dea?: 2 points
* Month photo was taken?: 1/2 point
* Day of the month photo was taken?: 1/2 point
* Year photo was taken?: 1/2 point
* Exact time photo was taken?: 5 points
* Google Street View link?: 1 point


Photo #2
Where In the Hawaii is Edward Sugimoto? - December 1, 2010
Where In the Hawaii is Edward Sugimoto? – December 1, 2010

Points for Photo #2…
* Location?: 2 points
* General area?: 1 point
* Closest street(s)?: 1 point each
* Month photo was taken?: 1/2 point
* Day of the month photo was taken?: 1/2 point
* Year photo was taken?: 1/2 point
* Exact time photo was taken?: 5 points
* Google Street View link?: 1 point


Photo #3
Where In the Hawaii is Edward Sugimoto? - December 1, 2010
Where In the Hawaii is Edward Sugimoto? – December 1, 2010

Points for Photo #3…
* Creative Photo Caption?: 2 points
* Location?: 2 points
* General area?: 1 point
* Closest street(s)?: 1 point each
* Who dat at the Lifeguard station?: 2 points each
* Why wuz we dea?: 5 points
* Month photo was taken?: 1/2 point
* Day of the month photo was taken?: 1/2 point
* Year photo was taken?: 1/2 point
* Exact time photo was taken?: 5 points
* Google Street View link?: 1 point


Last Week’s Results:
Ho, I wasn’t joking when I said was goin’ be hahd last week! Most questions went unanswered. Does that mean I can re-use um? πŸ˜› tweetpeep22, Coconut Willy, Paco and Rosette were still able to eek out a few points though! ‘Grats tp, C Dubbs, 2Pac and Rosey! πŸ™‚

Da Leadahboard (Round 2)!

  • 70.5 – Masako
  • 37.5 – Takeshi
  • 31.5 – Paco
  • 18.0 – rayboyjr
  • 17.0 – kuya.d
  • 10.5 – AlMan68
  • 08.0 – Coconut Willy, Rosette
  • 06.5 – tweetpeep22, NeedaHobby
  • 06.0 – che, MakiSushi
  • 04.0 – am
  • 03.5 – bB
  • 03.0 – kickerbear
  • 02.5 – pink lady
  • 02.0 – sshawnn, M, Kage, EMM386
  • 01.5 – mcat
  • 01.0 – effenprincess, Chicken Grease, carokun, Ynaku, 9th Island Cuz

Check out my new article on AroundHawaii.com entitled: “Hike, Bike, or the Like – Give the Pearl Harbor Bike Path a Whirl“! *grin*

Hike, Bike, or the Like - Give the Pearl Harbor Bike Path a Whirl
Hike, Bike, or the Like – Give the Pearl Harbor Bike Path a Whirl


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My Blog
:: My Blog ::
(Random stuffs)
My Facebook
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(Add a brutha! πŸ˜› )
My Job
:: My Job ::
(Road Runner Mobile)

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Have a happy VH07V Wednesday and beginning of December y’all! Don’t forget to post your guesses below k? Shoooots!

Hike, Bike, or the Like – Give the Pearl Harbor Bike Path a Whirl

December 1, 2010

On a somewhat recent episode of Dog the Bounty Hunter, Dog and his posse went chasing down a fugitive in some dense forestry-looking area on our `aina. Upon closer examination, I recogmatized um as da place we biked back in August: The Pearl Harbor Bike Path. What better time to write about it for y’all right?

Now I need to start with a disclaimer. If being on Dog the Bounty Hunter is any indication, there could conceivably be certain areas of the path that may be viewed as “shady” to some. For parts of the ride, wifey kept saying that it probably wouldn’t be safe for people to run/ride by themselves. Personally, I felt perfectly fine, but that’s probably because I’m the proud owner of this intimidating gun show (*flexes*). πŸ˜› All kidding aside, if you don’t feel safe or feel like you can’t protect yourself, take some friends along if you choose to do this path.

With that outta the way, let’s get a rollin’!

I’ve read reports that the trail can be anywhere from 8 to 18 miles or more, spanning the areas between Aiea to Waipahu to even Nanakuli! I guess it just depends where you decide to start and how far you wanna take it (see map from the DOT. Our particular adventures started from Aiea and went to Waipahu and back. Check it!

Depending on where *you* decide to start, the parking sitch may not be the greatest. We opted to start on the Aiea Bay State Recreation Area side, which meant finding parking in the surrounding neighborhoods near Aloha Stadium (to the chagrin of those living in the area). Note: We later discovered that there is actually a parking lot for the park (recreation area) if you enter in through McGrew Loop off Kamehameha Highway (view Google Street View). Whether or not you trust your car parked there – while people watch you unload your bike and ride off – is up to you.

So if you parked in the Aloha Stadium area like we did, just make your way north, down Kamehameha Highway and take a left at this little side street with no name (Google Street View). That will lead you to the Aiea Bay State Recreation Area and beginning (southeast portion) of the Pearl Harbor Bike Path.

Pearl Harbor Bike Path in the Aiea Bay State Recreation Area [Photo Courtesy: Todd Wakida]
Pearl Harbor Bike Path in the Aiea Bay State Recreation Area [Photo Courtesy: Todd Wakida]

(That’s a photo of my friend Jay at the Aiea Bay State Recreation Area on the return trip. Sorry, I didn’t have any photos of us going in the other direction.)

As you start your journey, you will actually travel under a portion of the Moanalua Freeway (HI-78), giving you a neat, not often-seen perspective.

Under the Moanalua Freeway (HI-78)
Under the Moanalua Freeway (HI-78)

Soon you’ll find yourself on the backside of Pearl Kai Shopping Center. Perhaps, if you were a member of 24 Hour Fitness back in the day when it was here, you might remember seeing some mysterious road with joggers prancing along it? Well, that was the Pearl Harbor Bike Path! Mystery solved! πŸ˜› Here’s the only shot I have (from AndHere.com) of the backside of Pearl Kai. It’s the parking lot underneath the old 24 Hour Fitness.

The back of Pearl Kai Shopping Center [Photo Courtesy: AndHere.com]
The back of Pearl Kai Shopping Center [Photo Courtesy: AndHere.com]

Eventually, you’ll pass by Best Buy, Harbor Center, Cutter Ford, and Neal S. Blaisdell Park.

Neal S. Blaisdell Park
Neal S. Blaisdell Park

This is a good place to catch your breath and grab some water (and use the potty).

A few strip malls later, you’ll instantly recognize the back side of the Hawaiian Electric power plant…

Hawaiian Electric power plant
Hawaiian Electric power plant

… Followed by a cute little taro patch/field.

Taro patch/field
Taro patch/field

At this point, you’ll be riding parallel with the H-1 (westbound) for a little while with East Loch to your left. Passing Pearl City Peninsula on your left, things will open up at Middle Loch, where you’ll see some pretty cool ships docked out at sea.

Ships at Middle Loch
Ships at Middle Loch

As you pass Middle Loch and make your way towards West Loch…

Path between Middle Loch and West Loch
Path between Middle Loch and West Loch

I noticed something really disturbing.

Pollution along the Pearl Harbor Bike Path
Pollution along the Pearl Harbor Bike Path

At the end of the little river/canal/stream that ran alongside of the bike path (Kapakahi Stream?), there was a build-up of trash and waste, including a shopping cart and even a spare tire! This is hereby a plea to the city to please take a close look into this! Mahaloz!

Finally, you’ll make it to Waipahu Home Depot Road where you’ll take a right to head towards Farrington Highway. Along the way, you’ll notice HUGE stacks of compacted recycled goods (at an Ewa Repair Shop? or Depot Metal Inc.?), a good a time as any for a photo opp! πŸ™‚

Compacted recycled Goods at Ewa Repair Shop
Compacted recycled Goods at Ewa Repair Shop

Continue to make your way towards Farrington Highway and you’ll start to get your bearings. You’ll pass by Servco Auto Leeward when you hit the highway. Strange coming from that direction yeah?

Since we were hungry, we decided to stop by at Tanioka’s to rest our bones…

Our bikes outside of Tanioka's
Our bikes outside of Tanioka’s

And pound some ono poke.

Poke and rice (with the IntelliGo) next to the Tanioka's Menu  [Photo Courtesy: AndHere.com]
Poke and rice (with the IntelliGo) next to the Tanioka’s MenuΒ  [Photo Courtesy: AndHere.com]

A big mahalos to bruddah Donovan for hooking us up with some ono grindz!

With our bellies full and bones well rested, it was time to make the return trip back to Aiea. Rather than listening to my annoying commentary, let’s press the mute button on me and enjoy the photos of the ride back in peace and quiet.

Jay with his leftovers
Jay with his leftovers

Above Middle Loch
Above Middle Loch

Todd and wifey
Todd and wifey

Wifey and I [Photo Courtesy: Todd Wakida]
Wifey and I [Photo Courtesy: Todd Wakida]

Signage
Signage

Todd and Jay
Todd and Jay

More fields
More fields

Behind HECO
Behind HECO

Todd's
Todd’s “handsome” face

Peesu
Peesu

Jay and wifey
Jay and wifey

All smiles
All smiles

East Loch [Photo Courtesy: Todd Wakida]
East Loch [Photo Courtesy: Todd Wakida]

Right next to the freeway
Right next to the freeway

Almost there...
Almost there…

We made it! [Photo Courtesy: Todd Wakida]
We made it! [Photo Courtesy: Todd Wakida]

I wanna say the entire trip probably only took like 2-3 hours, including the lunch break, but that’s just my guesstimate. An overall fun, and different adventure that you and your homeys can enjoy one (or every) weekend. Just remember to bring a friend if you’re not with me. πŸ˜‰

Waipahu Students Making a Difference

February 15, 2010

Happy Presidents’ (Washington’s Birthday) Day y’all. I have the day off and am busy poke-ing it up in Hilo, but thought that this story would be a good read for those of you who are still checkin’ on in today.

My friend and classmate from high school (Roslyn Kanae) is the Tech Coordinator at Honowai Elementary School. She shared a story about some of her students, known as the Honowai Robotek Team, making a difference in their community. Check out their story and I’ll meetcha at the bottom:

Honowai Elementary School is located on Honowai Street in the Ewa end of Waipahu. It services 824 students, grades preschool through 6th. Many of our students walk to school due to working parents. Six years ago, our principal and vice-principal met with the Department of Transportation to resolve the issue of speeding cars in front of the school. (Honowai Street is a busy road that leads into Fort Weaver Road before it joins with H2.) This meeting resulted in having two bright yellow pedestrian signs posted at the crosswalks fronting the school.

For the past two years, students at Honowai Elementary School have studied the traffic patterns fronting Honowai Street. Students have clocked cars going 5-10 miles over the speed limit in front of Honowai before, after, and during school hours.

Students have also interviewed faculty and community members about the speeding issue. Some nearby residents have seen many near- misses between speeding cars and students. Speeding cars injured three students during the past five years. No residents can recall ever seeing a police car ticketing cars for speeding down this busy thoroughfare. There are currently no posted signs to remind drivers that an elementary school is present; only the signs for pedestrian crossings and one 25 miles per hour speed limit sign.

To help slow the traffic fronting Honowai Street, the Honowai Robotek Team proposes that the two lane road be restriped to visually narrow the road and posting signs with flashing lights to remind drivers that children are present. They are also recommending that police cars monitor Honowai Street more frequently during school hours.

The students have presented their suggestions to Councilman Nestor Garcia, Representative Henry Aquino, Senator Clarence Nishihara, the Waipahu Community Neighborhood Board, and forty families from Honowai Elementary School. On February 12, 2010, the student members of the Honowai Robotek Team presented their findings at the 2010 S.M.A.R.T. Youth Summit held at Leeward Community College. The Honowai Robotek Team is also currently drafting a resolution for the Waipahu Neighborhood Community Board to approve at the February 25th meeting. The resolution, like their presentation, is completely student written. This is the most comprehensive traffic safety project ever undertaken by students at Honowai Elementary.

Honowai's Robotek Team
The members of the Honowai Robotek Team are sixth graders: Francis Camama, Abigail Aguada, Ray Anne Galzote, Cyndie Rayoan, Breana Domingo, Crystopher Mendoza, Katherine Piniol, Lourdes Dela Cruz, and 5th grader Sherrie Gracie. The coaches are Kawika Davis, Grant Kiyabu, Roslyn Kanae, and Rainard Mineshima.

Pretty impressive yeah? Our young keiki making a difference! Congrats Honowai Elementary! Keep it up gang!

Post your words of encouragement below if you gotum! Have a great week y’all!